An Artist's Journeys in Nature

Posts tagged “art

My Etsy Store

patriarch-riconI’ve just re-opened my Etsy shop, which has lain empty for a number of years.  Great to have my own store again!

As well as the 13 prints that I’ve uploaded to the shop in the past couple of days, I shall be adding more – and starting some new works for the store.

Prints and cards only are available at this stage – but as I develop production infrastructure (ha! sounds good doesn’t it LOL), I hope to offer more products in the future.

And the great thing is that customers will be buying direct from me!  Click on the image below to pay a visit.  And if you like something there, please Favorite it, to encourage me – thank you!

wildlife-and-nature-artworks

Enjoy!

Patricia


‘Unfolding’ – Botanical Art

Fern Frond Unfolding - PencilStill working on items for Society6, so here’s another.

It’s based on the New Zealand ‘Kiokio’ fern – one of the Blechnums : Blechnum capense.  They often grow on  banks, and the fronds can reach quite a size – often 2 or 3 feet long.  They look like great green waterfalls.

Where there is plenty of sun falling on them, the tips of the fronds take on an orangey hue.

The interesting thing about this genus is that its fertile, spore-bearing fronds are a distinctly different shape from its normal fronds.

I’ve brought this out in the painting – the fertile frond is shown in white silhouette behind the normal frond unfurling.

kiokio_450


Here in New Zealand, any kind of unfolding fern frond or ‘koru’ is regarded as a symbol of new beginnings, development and growth.  For me, it is also a symbol of enormous power.  A botanical magnifying glass reveals some mighty wonders!

Click on image for more details.

Patricia


Flight of The Kukupa

Kereru-kukupaHere’s a follow-on from my last post, as I’m busy putting up new items on Society6.

This is a painting of a NZ native pigeon (Hemiphaga novaeseelandiae), the Kereru, or as they’re called up here the Kukupa, soaring above the volcanic outcrop where I live.

They are quite a large bird, with very distinctive and beautiful coloring, the breast pure white, the head, neck, back and wings green of varying hues with purple and grey intermingled.  They have quite a heavy flight, although their nuptual flights in spring are quite spectacular.  A pair produces only one chick a year, so it it doesn’t take much brain to see how easily numbers become depleted.

Sadly, this bird is becoming scarce here because although they are protected, certain people think they have the right to take them for food.

Flight of The Kereru - Acrylic - Patricia Howitt

Flight of the Kukupa or Kereru – Native New Zealand Pigeon

When my parents moved in here about 40 years ago, and for many years after, the kukupa native woodpigeon could be seen in numbers swooping and soaring over the thermals from the warm rock face.

Nowadays, thanks to attention from some people, they are so depleted in numbers that I rarely see one in the bush, let alone up on the rock. The irony of it is that according to Maori tradition, the area behind this rock, known as ‘Kukuparere’ was fabled to be the place where ALL the Kereru birds in New Zealand originated from.  So much for respecting our treasured legends!  Where are the kaitiaki?

Click on the image for larger size and more details.

Patricia


Spirit of the Volcano

Volcano Spirit - Acrylic - Patricia HowittThought by way of a change, I’d add a painting I’ve just put up in my store on Society6.

This was inspired by New Zealand’s magnificent Central North Island Plateau (National Park as we call it) – the location for 3 volcanoes, 2 of them active.  Note: Mount Tongariro has proved me wrong on this, with a series of recent eruptions – Yay!   The ‘inactive’ volcano – Mount Tongariro – has so many blown-out craters, it’s probably more like a bunch of volcanoes in its own right.

If you saw the “Lord of The Rings” series, one of our active volcanoes on this plateau – Mt Ngauruohoe – was featured as Mt Doom.

Ngauruhoe is actually a beautiful, symmetrical cone, regarded as a female in Maori tradition, and she looks anything but ‘doomful’ under normal conditions.  She does, however, tend to have a plume of steam arising from her crater quite often – a sign that she is by no means as sweet-natured as she may look.

Anyway, the inspiration for this small ACEO painting was Mt Tongariro doing its undoubted best.  Click on the image for larger size and more details …

Volcano Spirit - Acrylic - Patricia Howitt


The Big Decision

Future Shock - Acrylic - Patricia HowittAt the age of 13 in the Scottish educational system, a pupil has to make the choice of what they want to do in life. Obviously a very big decision, quite hard to make at a relatively young age: I don’t know if things are the same now.

The options for me were Languages, Science and Art.

I wasn’t in any doubt what I wanted to do and it was called Art.

But here’s where one of life’s major disappointments reared its head: my father’s response was a flat, “No! You will never make a living at art. Keep it as a hobby and enjoy it.”

Hobby? Aaargh!

Burnout - Oils on Board - Patricia Howitt

This was painted later in life, after I moved to Wellington to work as a lawyer.  But it reflects the desolate feelings I had earlier – plus my grief at devastation of nature.  Click on image for more details.

Looking back, I can understand his reaction at that time, but it sure was hard on me.  What’s more, I was also very good at both languages and science.  It wasn’t as if art was my only option. So I didn’t have that leg to stand on.

One doesn’t argue with an RSM, especially my father.  With a great deal of sadness, I decided to go for languages.

There was nothing else to do but carry on …

The Bleeding of The Land - Acrylic - Patricia Howitt

The Bleeding of The Land – Acrylic – Patricia Howitt

This is another later painting and it’s worth clicking on the image for a fuller explanation of what’s behind it.

My dad’s comment impacted very heavily on my mind for far too long, and I am only just now beginning to shake it off.  What’s more, I never until very recently fully forgave him for what he’d said because as I grew older, and especially lately, I became so very aware what a strong influence it had on my thinking and choices since.

Though I sold quite a lot of art all through my legal career, I found I had indeed a very deep belief that I’d never make a living at it. How deep that belief was, I only discovered when I quit my job and moved up north here – about which, more later.  It seemed like I would never shake off the stigma (as I saw it) of not having been to Art School.

Parents: Be careful about what you say to your kids – especially about their dreams.  Select your words carefully.

Patricia


More Movies

Mars Ares Drawing - Patricia HowittCinemascope had hit the big screen. And my mom and I went to see “The Robe” from 20th Century Fox.

Aside from Disney, of any film I ever saw, this film had by far the widest and most lasting impact on me.  I had already been studying Latin at school from quite young (thanks to that great Scottish education), and I found it rather dry.

Now for the first time, the Roman world began to come alive. I bought the book, The Robe by Lloyd C Douglas, was fascinated by it, and started taking an interest in the Romans and their culture.

Menenius Agrippa & Boxer Drawings - Patricia Howitt

Menenius Agrippa Sculpture & Roman Boxer Drawings

More than that though, I got a crush on the movie’s leading man, Richard Burton.  Ah me – the effect of getting a teenage crush!  But it was a very good thing for creativity, all the same!

Doing the usual teenage girl crush stuff of finding out more about Burton’s career led me into the world of Shakespeare at The Old Vic, Alexander the Great, The Dark Tower by Louis MacNeice, Dylan Thomas’s Under Milk Wood, Coleridge’s Rime of The Ancient Mariner, and some of Christopher Fry’s plays. This new world I stumbled upon had an exciting richness of spirit.   Shakespeare took on new life, and I began to look at literature with different eyes.

All of this impacted on my art – especially Alexander the Great : the door on Classical Greek Art and Architecture was opened for the first time.  That was hugely valuable, because Greek sculpture taught me a lot about anatomy – along with a couple of books I got for Christmas presents. I spent some hours drawing anatomical studies from pictures of Greek pieces (didn’t they used to do that in Art School? – never thought of THAT at the time!)

Heracles & Warrior - Patricia Howitt

Greek Warrior Sculpture and Heracles Vase Drawings

The human body is arguably the hardest thing to render convincingly in art.  Quite a number of people doing art struggle noticeably in that area, though the Photoshop ‘Artists’ just grab photos of models, and solve their problem that way. And they call it ‘Art’?  Ha!  Which goes to show : the good old Art School disciplines – canned in this modern age of ‘permissive everything’ – had some great value, after all!

A couple of years ago, I picked up the B/W drawing at the head of this post and worked it into a full color art piece.  Click on the image for larger size and more details:

Ares Mars - God of War : Patricia Howitt

Ares / Mars – God of War Drawing

Done from a Roman sculpture – this is the most ornate helmet I’ve ever set eyes on : isn’t it gorgeous?

Patricia


First Steps in Art

Guy Fawkes - Patricia HowittSo what was I doing at this time?

The earliest piece I have, done within a couple of years of moving to Scotland, is a half-finished drawing on a sheet of lined paper ripped from a school exercise book of a tiger attacking a buffalo, copied freehand from an illustration in the book “Man-Eaters of Kumaon” by Major Jim Corbett.

It was perhaps the fist edition of this book, and there have been many since.  I’m not sure if they all have the original artwork, which I think was by the great wildlife artist, Bob Kuhn.  I remember being fascinated by the illustrations in that book – more quality artwork!

And though the book was technically a “hunting” book, it was special.  Jim Corbett has an enormous reputation as a humble yet highly skilled and patient hunter, who rid parts of India of some really dangerous wildlife, while at the same time showing humanity and care for wild animals.  In later life, he exchanged his rifle for a camera, as many hunters do.

Tiger Drawing & Guy Fawkes - Patricia Howitt

Tiger Drawing & Guy Fawkes Painting – Patricia Howitt

Another very early piece was this Guy Fawkes, developed from a black and white logo in a newspaper advertisement run by a fireworks company.  Inside the small circle, probably less than 1″ across, you could just see the face and the tall hat, the armful of fireworks and the side of Guy’s lantern.  Tiny as it was, the quality of the design made an arresting image.

My dad suggested I do something with it.  The challenge was to expand it out, bring in color, and still retain the play of light and shadow created by the lantern.  I was about 10 when I did that.

Learning About Art

Gradually, art awareness began to develop. With help, I was learning to analyze what I saw from a graphics point of view – maybe not with the improved understanding that comes from years of practice, book study and looking, but at least innately. My dad encouraged me to start a “swipe file” of pictures I liked, as a reference tool.  Over the years it grew to huge proportions, but it still contains stuff that dates back to that time.

Island Paradise - Patricia Howitt

Island Paradise – Colored Pencil

Soon, when looking at books or magazines, I was taking note of the artwork. How was that picture done? What about the composition? What about the colors? What about the angle?  At the time I was barely conscious of this, except to know that I enjoyed pictures, but through sharing my dad’s thoughts, the habit grew stronger and  never left me. It took me a while to realise that not everyone sees things this way.  Quite a shock!

Years later,  that old Tiger drawing got reworked it into a fantasy battle between a tiger and a huge snake.  Must have been looking at too much of Frank Frazetta’s  work, he had a real passion for huge snakes!

Tiger & Snake - Patricia Howitt

Tiger & Snake – Graphite Pencil

More coming

Patricia