An Artist's Journeys in Nature

Drawing

Black Mamaku Tree Fern

I painted this work over Christmas 1979/80. It was a time of great changes to come in my life, though I didn’t know it then. I was on a long Christmas vacation, having completed 3 units of science at Uni that year, and having decided science was not going to be my future.

I knew I would return to Wellington, but in what capacity I had no idea: I had no job. Meantime there was a long holiday spell to concentrate on art.

I painted 3 major pieces that Christmas and created a number of smaller works and some drawings. I put the drawings up for sale in a small local gallery and they sold immediately.

My father, who had always been my art mentor, disliked this painting intensely, and soon let me know it. I dug in my heels and carried on with it, and in January entered this piece and 2 other works into the Bay Of Islands New Year Art Exhibition in Paihia. Two were for sale – this one and Unfolding Fern Kiokio . The third one was The Sacred Place . They all passed the jury examination and the two pieces on sale sold during the exhibition.

So much for that!

I returned to Wellington and by an amazing turn of circumstances, within a couple of months I was full time National Secretary of the NZ Deerstalkers Association, with over 40 branches nationwide. a 7 man national executive that met quarterly and a large scale annual conference. I’d been involved with them for several years. Looking back, it was the happiest time of my life in a job. However –

During my first year there, my father was diagnosed with chronic lymphatic leukemia.

It’s a long way from Kaeo to Wellington (about 600 ml), so 18 months later I went back into law and moved north to Hamilton as regional solicitor for my former employer the ACC. This move was not an entirely happy one, but at least I saw more of my folks.

My dad died in August 1985 and that Christmas my mom and I came up here to get this place ready to put on the market. He had said we would have to sell the property and with the half-finished house which they had been building, he foretold we wouldn’t get much for it… It was a sad time.

But by Christmas, we had decided NOT to sell up!

I couldn’t bear the idea and nor could my mom. A huge load lifted in our spirits, because we both loved the property dearly. We did our sums and got a builder in to finish the house (drama, drama) and while my mom stayed here, I completed the lecturing contract I now had with the Waikato Polytechnic (Business Law for the NZ Society of Accountants’ qualification), visiting at weekends as much as I could.

By Christmas 1986 I was back up here to stay. The distance from this place to the New Zealand I had been used to is a bit daunting, but several attempts I’ve made to move have come to naught, so this must be where I am meant to be.

Christmas is always a time of great memories for me here.

Kathleen and the building on a sunny autumn day in 1986.

For more details on the work and to see products, click on the image.

Patricia


Turn Around

I’ve been out of circulation for quite a few months – and there’s a reason for that.   Back in late 2014 I was struck by a nasty disease called polymyalgia, which came close at the time to destroying my mobility.  Fortunately, once diagnosed, the solution was revealed – prednisone.

Aaargh!  Well I wasn’t entirely happy with that, but does one want to walk freely or not?  In addition, it was causing mayhem with my blood – too many platelets, anemia etc.  So my doctor put me on a modest dose of prednisone and over the period of about 18 months we tailed it back and achieved a recovery.

In the meantime, however, I had an accident and decided to go to a chiropractor (fortunately a very good one).   I’d had chiropractic before because I have 2 curves in my spine, not helped by riding horses.  So we entered into a process of sorting out these curves and re-stabilising my backbone.

I’d been quite depressed at the time of the polymyalgia – a mental state that was not helped by seeing all the things that needed doing round my 10 acre property and not being able to do a thing about them (physically or financially) – and so the obvious answer seemed to be to move away from this place, which I’ve been associated with for 47 years and have loved dearly.  I’d even got to the point where I wasn’t interested anymore.

But things kept getting in my way – not the least being shortage of finances to get things tidied up for sale.  On top of that I had a tree fall on my roof (damage? – oh yes!) and a second tree taken down because it was in danger of following suit.   Fallout everywhere.  Funds getting even lower.   I seemed to be stuck in mud.

Then just before last Christmas, the tide started to turn.  We began to win with the chiropractic.  I’m now getting around my land as in the old days – and for the most part it’s steep and hilly – and working quite hard, if carefully.  There are a few things I used to do and now cannot, but apart from that, the recovery is little short of miraculous.

I’ve decided to stay – how could I ever have thought of leaving?  To keep my grass down I’ve taken on breeding rare breeds Damara sheep.  My first 2 bought in early July are a Damara/Arapawa cross and her daughter.  Both have had lambs to a Damara crossbred ram, and I now have a fullblood Damara ram also.  So the headcount is currently 4 females and 2 males – and the lambs at 2 weeks old are a delight!

 

Below is one of my drawings of an Arapawa ram.  This breed, now officially accepted as a Rare Breed in this country, came about by early explorers and whalers dropping off sheep (probably of merino origin) on Arapawa Island in Cook Strait – where they continued to breed.  No doubt the motive was to provide a food source.

Initially they were regarded as game.  Later they were marked for extermination, until their value as a gene pool was recognized and a sanctuary established for them on the island, all thanks to the efforts of Betty Rowe and her husband Walt.  Now there are a number of breeders of Arapawa sheep throughout New Zealand.

Like Damaras, Arapawa sheep are shedders, and are naturally resistant to fly-strike.

So here we are!!  Hallelujah!

For prints, products and more details, click on the images.

Patricia

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The Angry Elk

angry-elk-iconPencil drawing of a bull Elk (or Wapiti) bugling during the mating season or rut.

In New Zealand, we call it ‘the roar’ – a time when young men’s fancies turn not to thoughts of love – not human love anyway – but to thoughts of bush stalking, cabins, tents, rifles, calibers, campfires and cameras.

For them, this is THE time of the year.

Very disappointing for the young maidens in their lives, but get used to it, it’s an immovable fact of life…

elk3_2_700

Original in graphite pencil, colorized in Photoshop.  B/W version available HERE.

angry-elk-products

Click on images for more details.

Patricia

http://patriciahowitt.com/


The Adversary Bellows a Reply

stag-roaring3-riconBefore long, once the challenge is given, a bellow of reply comes echoing back through the forest, and the Challenger knows for sure that a rival stag is after his harem.

Both red deer stags are on full alert now, and the ball is back in the Challenger’s court again.

As mentioned previously, it is likely the stags may not be able to see each other through the forest in these early stages, so they are sizing each other up on vocals as one call follows the next.

Slowly the stranger stag moves closer.  Once within sight of each other, they move in and engage quickly, lowering their antlers and locking them like wrestlers.  Then comes the test of strength, body weight and agility as they push back and forth, and circle, each trying to flip the other.

stag-roaring2_700

Getting flipped puts a stag at the mercy of his opponent, so frequently the stag who feels himself outmatched will break away and make a run for it, with his adversary in hot pursuit.

stag-roaring2_products

For more details about the artwork, click on the images.

Patricia

http://patriciahowitt.com/


Comes The Challenge

stag-roaring2-riconFollowing on from my All Muscle: Promoting The Great Outdoors post, the next thing one can expect if it’s mating season, or the rut (the roar as we call it in NZ), is the Challenge – in the Red Deer, a series of deep, guttural grunts, bellows, groans and huffs.

On the other hand, the first time I heard a bull elk – Cervus canadensis (or Wapiti in NZ) bugling, I was quite surprised at the high tone of the vocals, given the elk is a larger animal than the red deer.

It’s an eerie sound though, whichever species it comes from, and in the natural it carries a fair bit of emotion and suspense as the two stags size each other up and maneuver through the bush to get an advantage.   Quite often the stags can’t actually see each other during the initial stages of the encounter, so they are sizing each other up – trying through the vocals to get an indication of the age, size and seriousness of intention of the potential adversary, should the episode end up in a fight.

Well, here is the Red Stag (Cervus  elaphus) issuing his challenge:

stag-roaring3_700Graphite pencil drawing.

stag-roaring3-products

For more details about this work, click on the images.

Patricia

http://patriciahowitt.com/

 


All Muscle: Promoting The Great Outdoors

red-deer-iconI was blown away this morning to find that (for the first time ever) I sold two identical items to the same person.

This is probably my best-selling artwork – ‘All Muscle – Red Deer Stag’, and it certainly encapsulates the power and majesty of the great Cervus elaphus species of deer.

It has consistently sold well – on iPhone cases and posters, mainly, and I’m really pleased that it has appealed so much to hunters and wildlife lovers.  The world’s increasing fascination with technology needs to be balanced by reminding us of some real life, outdoors values.

The red deer species has a very wide distribution:  “The red deer inhabits most of Europe, the Caucasus Mountains region, Asia Minor, Iran, parts of western Asia, and central Asia. It also inhabits the Atlas Mountains region between Morocco and Tunisia in northwestern Africa, being the only species of deer to inhabit Africa.   Red deer have been introduced to other areas, including Australia, New Zealand, United States, Canada, Peru, Uruguay, Chile and Argentina.  In many parts of the world, the meat (venison) from red deer is used as a food source.” (Wikipedia)

In New Zealand, red deer are the most numerous of our introduced deer species, and hunting is encouraged throughout the north and south islands as a control measure, since they compete heavily with native birds and mammals for our unique bush habitat.

In late October I sold 2 shower curtains with the ‘All Muscle – Red Deer Stag’ artwork.  I believe they will grace and enliven someone’s bathrooms beautifully, and I hope they are much enjoyed and admired.

all-muscle-shower-curtain2

The greatest thing that comes out of these sales is not the money (which is precious little, in fact), but the knowledge that someone liked the work enough to want to live with it – or maybe give it away to a friend.

Patricia

http://patriciahowitt.com/


Matariki

Fern Frond Unfolding - PencilMatariki is the Maori name for The Pleiades (The Seven Sisters), and it means the ‘eyes of god’ (mata ariki) or ‘little eyes’ (mata riki).

The Polynesian adventurers who discovered and colonised New Zealand about the end of the first century AD were extremely conversant with the planets and their passages.

It was this knowledge, plus an observation of the flight paths of migratory birds, that enabled them to undertake huge voyages across the Pacific Ocean – initially from west to east, and later back in a southwesterly direction to find the islands that they were to name ‘Aotearoa’ or ‘Land of The Long White Cloud”.

The rising of the Pleiades (late May early June in Aotearoa New Zealand) is regarded as the Maori New Year, and it is a time for celebrating a new start.

Traditionally, it was a time for remembering the dead, and celebrating new life.

To this symbol, I  added the Koru or unfurling fern frond, a favorite subject for me – also a very strong symbol for birth and new beginnings.

And of course, Matariki is a great time for the burgeoning of artistic endeavor, too.

koru-matariki_700
Digital design work created using the Bezier Pen Tool (vector).  Below is my original pencil drawing, done from an unfurling fern frond with the aid of a botanical magnifying glass.

koru1

This post is a follow-up to a reference made in “The Journey“.

Patricia


More Classics

Greek Vase Painting - Patricia HowittOf course, it wasn’t too long before a “Movies” scrapbook got started.

It was  mainly for movies about Greece and Rome, and I combed the magazine stands for movie magazines with reviews on anything new in the genre.

Today, things haven’t really changed.  The Internet is a wonderful medium for making “scrapbooks”, and we create them all the time – be it in blogs or static websites, with photos, artwork or videos.  It’s really great to catch up legitimately with an old hobby in a new format – without feeling ‘wussy’ !

And naturally, there had to be more artworks …Alexander & Caryatids Drawings - Patricia Howitt

The Masters of Greek Vase Painting

The other thing I frequently go back to in wonderment is Greek vase painting. I love the limited palettes, the brilliant composition, the strong but sensitive lines.  These artists were indeed masters:

Greek Vase Art 1

Greek Vase Art 2

And a little tribute of mine:

Ganymede & Heracles - Patricia Howitt

But the Greek Vase painters didn’t have it all on their own – more next time!

Patricia


More Movies

Mars Ares Drawing - Patricia HowittCinemascope had hit the big screen. And my mom and I went to see “The Robe” from 20th Century Fox.

Aside from Disney, of any film I ever saw, this film had by far the widest and most lasting impact on me.  I had already been studying Latin at school from quite young (thanks to that great Scottish education), and I found it rather dry.

Now for the first time, the Roman world began to come alive. I bought the book, The Robe by Lloyd C Douglas, was fascinated by it, and started taking an interest in the Romans and their culture.

Menenius Agrippa & Boxer Drawings - Patricia Howitt

Menenius Agrippa Sculpture & Roman Boxer Drawings

More than that though, I got a crush on the movie’s leading man, Richard Burton.  Ah me – the effect of getting a teenage crush!  But it was a very good thing for creativity, all the same!

Doing the usual teenage girl crush stuff of finding out more about Burton’s career led me into the world of Shakespeare at The Old Vic, Alexander the Great, The Dark Tower by Louis MacNeice, Dylan Thomas’s Under Milk Wood, Coleridge’s Rime of The Ancient Mariner, and some of Christopher Fry’s plays. This new world I stumbled upon had an exciting richness of spirit.   Shakespeare took on new life, and I began to look at literature with different eyes.

All of this impacted on my art – especially Alexander the Great : the door on Classical Greek Art and Architecture was opened for the first time.  That was hugely valuable, because Greek sculpture taught me a lot about anatomy – along with a couple of books I got for Christmas presents. I spent some hours drawing anatomical studies from pictures of Greek pieces (didn’t they used to do that in Art School? – never thought of THAT at the time!)

Heracles & Warrior - Patricia Howitt

Greek Warrior Sculpture and Heracles Vase Drawings

The human body is arguably the hardest thing to render convincingly in art.  Quite a number of people doing art struggle noticeably in that area, though the Photoshop ‘Artists’ just grab photos of models, and solve their problem that way. And they call it ‘Art’?  Ha!  Which goes to show : the good old Art School disciplines – canned in this modern age of ‘permissive everything’ – had some great value, after all!

A couple of years ago, I picked up the B/W drawing at the head of this post and worked it into a full color art piece.  Click on the image for larger size and more details:

Ares Mars - God of War : Patricia Howitt

Ares / Mars – God of War Drawing

Done from a Roman sculpture – this is the most ornate helmet I’ve ever set eyes on : isn’t it gorgeous?

Patricia


Art and School

I had arrived in Still Life Bottle Painting - Patricia HowittScotland with a perfect BBC accent. Aberdonians are very Scottish, very patriotic, egalitarian and up-front. No place to be talking like a London radio announcer, as I soon found out.  That BBC accent disappeared very quickly.

My new school was the High School for Girls in Aberdeen, now Harlaw Academy where pupils gain the advantage of a great Scottish education. I was there for 8 years in total – my longest term at any school by a long shot.  In spite of our continual house moving though, my parents had always made sure I got the best possible schooling.  This settled period at an excellent school occurred at just the right time in my education.

Outside of school, I started off making scrapbooks of pictures I liked, embellished with painted artwork and lettering, drawing on ideas from magazines and books.  My stamp album got the same treatment.  And though with some of these ideas I was copying from existing artwork or photos, I’ve come to appreciate that the discipline of doing that started to train my eye really well.

Tiger - Indian Dancers - Patricia Howitt

Leaping Tiger and Indian Dancers Illustrations

The leaping tiger was an icon used by Esso Petroleum at the time.

Getting close to pipe band competitions on Scottish soil inspired a pencil study of a Highland dancer, drawn from a photo in the local newspaper – I’m glad I have that.  Not many people outside of Scotland realize that Highland dancing is actually an excellent fitness training.  Traditionally, in Highland Regiments the soldiers did PT and the officers did Highland Dancing, to stay fit.  Highland dancing is something I loved at school and would take up again, if there were any close to me – I was always happy when we walked into the gym and saw the pianist sitting at the piano!

Highland Fling Drawing - Patricia Howitt

Helmet Illustration and Highland Fling Drawing

The sword and helmet design was also an embellishment in one of my scrapbooks.

Still Life Bottle & Vase Paintings - Patricia Howitt

Still Life Bottle & Vase Paintings – School Art

There was plenty of Art at school in the early days –  I still have one or two of the many things we created in art classes.  Of course, we were given the usual array of still life subjects, but it seems at some stage our art teacher got creative and found something especially taxing for us to focus on:

They’re actually quite tricky subjects, and I’m glad to have these two paintings still – mainly because I used the backs of them for designing something else. (It’s called keeping a portfolio -Haha!)  They would have been done in my early teens.

As we got to the higher classes, we were encouraged to produce black and white ink illustrations for use in the annual school magazine.

My first was of Alice in Wonderland, drinking from the bottle and holding her hand on the top of her head to see if she was growing any taller. No prizes for guessing where that idea came from, but I remember especially the art teacher’s help and encouragement in creating it.  I know it was accepted for the magazine, and so were a couple more in later years.

I wish I still had those magazines…

Parents – keep your kids’ art stuff!

Patricia


More Elleston Trevor Kids’ Books Artwork

Into The Happy Glade Since today’s Sunday here in Aotearoa, I’m giving myself a quiet day.  (Only in name – I have gardening to do.)

So I’m simply adding a few more illustrations from the Elleston Trevor books to supplement the pictures in my last post “Elleston Trevor – Spies, Badgers, Kites and Miniature Cars“.

As I mentioned there, these books open up a wonderful world of pioneering, ‘do it yourself’ innovation that’s rapidly being lost in today’s world.  Children’s toys these days are ‘plastic fantastic’ and they come with everything supplied – minimum imagination and minimum inventiveness required. And for that reason, they soon pall. So parents have to look round for something else.  And the cash register rings again.  What a waste!

It’s sad, because kids are missing out on developing one of the most important faculties a human being can acquire – CREATIVITY.

In New Zealand we call it the “Number 8 Wire Mindset”, harking back to the days when it used to be said that a NZ farmer could mend or create just about anything with a piece of Number 8 fencing wire. Here at least, we still put a premium on ingenuity.

These books bring to light for kids who’ve never had the experience, just what it means to  be self-reliant, resourceful and handy with one’s hands (paws, wing-tips or whatever).  The stories are full of activity, sharing, goodwill and the creative spirit.

W A Ward illustrations for “By A Silver Stream”:

By A Silver Stream Illustrations by W A Ward

David Williams illustrations for “Heather Hill”:

Heather Hill Illustrations by David Williams

Dust Jacket images for these children’s books on the net are not the best, and of course it’s rare for old titles to come with dust jackets now, anyway.  But I’ve worked on what I could get, tidied up scuffs and torn edges and hopefully improved on what’s out there.  The “Heather Hill” dust jacket illustration in my last post was the worst – there’s a limit to what you can do even with Photoshop.  Maybe a better “Heather Hill” dust jacket image will surface over time.

Into The happy Glade and By A Silver Stream Dust Jackets

Check out the only available Reviews of Elleston Trevor’s Children’s books.

Patricia


Elleston Trevor – Spies, Badgers, Kites and Miniature Cars

By A Silver Stream Dust JacketA British novelist who wrote prolifically (110 books) under a number of pseudonyms, Elleston Trevor’s best-known writings are thriller and Cold War spy novels.

He was a versatile writer, his most popular works being “The Flight of the Phoenix”, and the Quillar and Hugo Bishop series, both under the pseudonym Alex Hall.  He was born Trevor Dudley-Smith.

When he died in Arizona in 1995, his obituary in The Independent described the Quillar novels as “best-selling, tough and suspenseful spy thrillers with a distinctly noir-ish edge, featuring an ice-cold killing-machine, or “shadow executive”, called Quiller”.  Furthermore –

“During the 1950s Trevor was one of Heinemann’s star popular authors. Along with Nevil Shute, the Americans Erle Stanley Gardner, Erskine Caldwell and Frank Yerby, the Australian Arthur Upfield … and the incomparable Georgette Heyer.   At one stage a short Authors At Home promotional film was shot at Trevor’s home in Roedean, near Brighton, where he was glimpsed at his typewriter, and flying kites and racing miniature cars, both hobbies he followed with enthusiasm.”

Children’s Books Too

It’s hard to believe that at the same time this man was also writing delightful children’s books -about 25 kids’ books in all.  And along with many other youngsters I loved and read them.  “By A Silver Stream” and “Heather Hill” are two I’ve managed to get hold of again so far.  But prices are high:

By A Silver Stream & Heather Hill

These were akin to “The Wind in the Willows“, based around themes of humanized small animals, but with a kind of pioneering twist.  There are no psychological ‘Toad’ dramas here (thank goodness) – no Toad in fact, although there ARE venerable badgers, wise owls, excitable field mice, frogs, rabbits and peaceable moles.  There are challenges though, of the kind that would appeal to any child with a practical bent – resettling a community deeper in the forest to avoid confrontation with man, building suitable houses, laying on water pipes, finding resources and transporting them home, making boats and gathering supplies for any job on hand.  And above all, these stories are told with a wonderful, dry humor that brings the characters and amusing events to life.

They are well illustrated, mainly with a single full-page illustration and numerous smaller sketches throughout.  “Into A Happy Glade‘, “By A Silver Stream“, “Deep Wood“, “Heather Hill” and the “Wumpus” series stand out in my memory. W A Ward (for “By A Silver Stream”) and David Williams (for “Heather Hill”) were the illustrators whose work is shown above.

These books are hard to come by now, but they still have some ardent followers – especially in the UK.  For many youngsters of the era, they formed the basis of a lifetime’s love of animals and nature.

Deep Wood & Heather Hill Dust Jackets

I’ve collected together the only available Reviews of Elleston Trevor’s Children’s books from Amazon.co.uk – because I believe these books have something that’s often lacking in today’s children’s story offerings.  Check them out they are all together on one page!

Patricia


C F Tunnicliffe – Wildlife Illustrator and Artist

C F TunnicliffeI’d been given four small books in a series published by The Studio in London.  One was “How To Draw Farm Animals”  by Charles F Tunnicliffe.

There was also “How To Draw Birds” by Raymond Sheppard, “Baby Animals On The Farm” by Vere Temple and another, the name of which escapes me.  They were all excellent learning tools by real quality artists – CF Tunnicliffe in particular created an enormous oeuvre of top quality work, illustrating at least 250 books – some written by himself and some authored by others.

From school, Tunnicliffe won a scholarship to the Royal College of Art in London, and from then on his busy working life began. He was honored by the art establishment, and the Crown.  In 1978, he was awarded the Order of the British Empire – a year before he died in 1979.   Tunnicliffe was the subject of a 1981 BBC Wales television documentary, True to Nature, produced by Derek Trimby and narrated by Robert Dougall.

I was fortunate. Having these books as an instruction and an example was really good for me, and they also got me closer to appreciating the world of animals and birds in art.

I’m gradually chasing these artists down, thanks to the Internet, and recently bought C F Tunnicliffe’s “Bird Portraiture”, published by The Studio in 1945 with a reprint in 1946.  I scanned the pictures below, and don’t think they appear anywhere else on the net:

Tunnicliffe Illustrations 2

CF Tunnicliffe “Bird Portraiture” Illustrations

Tunnicliffe - Bird Portraiture 1

C F Tunnicliffe - Geese

Though Tunnicliffe’s regular subjects were wildlife and the countryside, whenever he includes humans in any of his works, they take their places naturally in the scene, executed with the same style and authenticity as his landscapes, animals and birds.

Tunnicliffe - Ploughing

C F Tunnicliffe – Ploughing Illustration from “Bird Portraiture”

He has come to be regarded as arguably one of the greatest wildlife artists of all time.

Patricia


First Steps in Art

Guy Fawkes - Patricia HowittSo what was I doing at this time?

The earliest piece I have, done within a couple of years of moving to Scotland, is a half-finished drawing on a sheet of lined paper ripped from a school exercise book of a tiger attacking a buffalo, copied freehand from an illustration in the book “Man-Eaters of Kumaon” by Major Jim Corbett.

It was perhaps the fist edition of this book, and there have been many since.  I’m not sure if they all have the original artwork, which I think was by the great wildlife artist, Bob Kuhn.  I remember being fascinated by the illustrations in that book – more quality artwork!

And though the book was technically a “hunting” book, it was special.  Jim Corbett has an enormous reputation as a humble yet highly skilled and patient hunter, who rid parts of India of some really dangerous wildlife, while at the same time showing humanity and care for wild animals.  In later life, he exchanged his rifle for a camera, as many hunters do.

Tiger Drawing & Guy Fawkes - Patricia Howitt

Tiger Drawing & Guy Fawkes Painting – Patricia Howitt

Another very early piece was this Guy Fawkes, developed from a black and white logo in a newspaper advertisement run by a fireworks company.  Inside the small circle, probably less than 1″ across, you could just see the face and the tall hat, the armful of fireworks and the side of Guy’s lantern.  Tiny as it was, the quality of the design made an arresting image.

My dad suggested I do something with it.  The challenge was to expand it out, bring in color, and still retain the play of light and shadow created by the lantern.  I was about 10 when I did that.

Learning About Art

Gradually, art awareness began to develop. With help, I was learning to analyze what I saw from a graphics point of view – maybe not with the improved understanding that comes from years of practice, book study and looking, but at least innately. My dad encouraged me to start a “swipe file” of pictures I liked, as a reference tool.  Over the years it grew to huge proportions, but it still contains stuff that dates back to that time.

Island Paradise - Patricia Howitt

Island Paradise – Colored Pencil

Soon, when looking at books or magazines, I was taking note of the artwork. How was that picture done? What about the composition? What about the colors? What about the angle?  At the time I was barely conscious of this, except to know that I enjoyed pictures, but through sharing my dad’s thoughts, the habit grew stronger and  never left me. It took me a while to realise that not everyone sees things this way.  Quite a shock!

Years later,  that old Tiger drawing got reworked it into a fantasy battle between a tiger and a huge snake.  Must have been looking at too much of Frank Frazetta’s  work, he had a real passion for huge snakes!

Tiger & Snake - Patricia Howitt

Tiger & Snake – Graphite Pencil

More coming

Patricia


Art and the Cartoon Comic – 2

Michelangelo Icon - Patricia HowittMichelangelo didn’t limit himself to drawing from life.  In 1492 at 17 years of age he put himself in serious danger by dissecting dead bodies in the mortuary of the Santo Spirito monastery in Florence.

The penalty for interfering with human remains was death.  Why would he do that?  To understand how the human body is constructed and how it works – and that is what gave such unprecedented life and movement to his paintings and sculptures.

Drawing – Making Line Live

I’ve come to appreciate that though I never went to art school, I did get a pretty rigorous training in drawing and in making what I created truly express the reality. This came from my dad’s critique, which harked back to the good old basics of looking hard at one’s subject-matter, understanding it and capturing it. 

If what I drew or painted didn’t look like what it was meant to be, and didn’t have life, I GOT ROASTED.  If the technique was weak or fussy,  I GOT ROASTED.  About that, more later.

So I came to value clarity of line, especially when it expresses 3 dimensional mass and movement economically.

Cat & Towel Pencil Studies - Patricia Howitt

Sleeping Cat and Towel Pencil Studies

The Second Principle : Strength of Composition – Design

Composition is arguably THE most important element of a painting – sculpture too, though it’s more complex in three dimensions.  If there’s one thing that really puts me off, it’s a painting with a number of elements scattered around the space, without real consideration for the overall layout of the composition as a whole.  No design!  And that happens more often than you might think.  And the average person doesn’t see it.

Look at frames from Disney cartoon movies, and see how all-pervading good composition and design was in the huge array of Disney’s animations – masterly! Given the number of artists working for Disney at any one time over the years, maintaining such consistency is a huge achievement in itself.

Disney Movie Frames

Walt Disney Cinderella and Alice in Wonderland Frames

Taking the subject of composition a little deeper, here’s something most people are totally unaware of.  It was clearly explained in a book called ‘The Painter’s Secret Geometry: A Study of Composition in Art’ by Charles Bouleau, which I have among my texts.  The book is out of print now, but people on Amazon are crying for a reprint.  I really can’t improve on this short excerpt from a review by T Campbell:

This is the art history text we all should have had and didn’t. It is the only book I have found in several years of looking into what has been printed on composition/design in the 2-D arts that actually shows the manner in which artists in a number of Greco-Roman to western traditions managed their space. It was certainly not the “I’m OK, you’re OK” approach that is so common now. The great ones then, and to a certain degree even now, were very well educated in their traditions, which included mathematics, especially geometry, the application of which to image making was connected to their faith, as well as being an expression of their genius.

Bouleau carries his argument into the 20th century and shows that respect for geometric spatial division to establish harmony is not dead. It still works, even with completely nonrepresentational art.

This is a stunningly informative look at the visual arts in the European traditions and is the only book I have found that informs me on how the “old masters” and some contemporary masters built their paintings.”

Below are works by 2 relatively modern artists, showing their use of geometric principles in composition.  “Miserere” by Georges Roualt and “Composition ll in Red, Yellow and Blue” by Piet Mondrian:

Georges-Roualt-Piet-Mondrian

Georges Roualt and Piet Mondrian : A Painter’s Secret Geometry

Don’t be misled: this is not a case of art being forced into a geometric matrix to suit some theory.  Just as mathematics underlies much of our world (think of music, for a start), it is inescapably true that artworks whose composition or design complies with certain geometric principles, are more powerful and satisfying.

Hence the value of basing your studies as an artist on the very best of traditional and contemporary masters.

Patricia


Art and the Cartoon Comic – 1

Aberdeen - Patricia HowittMoving up to Aberdeen when I was 8 marked the real beginning of art in my life.  From this point on, ‘artistic’ output and awareness really started to develop, and revelations came thick and fast.

We lived first in a semi-detached Army villa in the suburb of Seafield. At the bottom of the street was – is – a small park called Johnstone Gardens built around a rocky landscaped stream, surrounded by paths, shrubberies, flower beds and rock gardens, with tall trees as a backdrop. I was given my first little camera and shot many photos – now lost – in that park. 

My mom took me there often : it was a ‘wild’ landscape in miniature.

Magnolia Screenprint - Patricia Howitt

Magnolia Screenprint – Patricia Howitt

I’d just got a serial comic – it was Odham’s “Mickey Mouse Weekly”.  My folks enjoyed it too, but I’m sure my dad was looking for artistic quality in what he chose, and I’m really grateful. I looked forward to that comic, and devoured its contents.  It wasn’t all Disney though – many of the other cartoons and illustrations were of a different quality and appealed less.  I found myself gradually getting a preference for the Disney style of artwork.

Two principles stand out in Disney’s works, and I’d like to think they are a good training ground for any artist.  Firstly, clarity of line. The Disney line is stylish in its boldness. Eye and hand are coordinated to produce a highly polished, clean result.

The First Principle : Clarity of Line (ie Draftsmanship)

In today’s art world it’s kinda cutesy and clever to leave your viewers guessing.  “Is that a fish or a bird?”  “Is that a person standing in all that murk or is it an elephant?”  Hmmmm.  Too many people are getting away with bad draftsmanship because their creations are regarded as “innovative” or “thought-provoking”.  We are putting a premium on gimmickry rather than solid grounding.  Art is becoming cerebral instead of visceral in its appeal. 

Maybe the fact that the Universities have got in on the act of training people to be artists has something to do with it.

I admire Prince Charles for stepping up to the plate and founding The Prince’s Drawing School.  It’s time someone stood up for the real fundamental values in Art. There’s nothing ‘old fashioned’ about it – these fundamentals apply to digital art just as they’ve done to traditional art through the centuries.  For more information see also Wikipedia on The Prince’s Drawing School.

Botanical- Coprosma-Cape-Gooseberry

Botanical Illustration – Coprosma and Cape Gooseberry

Photographs are definitely not art

Right now, photography is doing its darndest to take over the Art space.  Many would say, “If you can get a good photograph why go for paintings?”  And that, of course, provides another excuse for the current trends in Art proper.  Well, I’m sorry, photographs (even manipulated, Photoshopped ones) won’t ever compare, and that’s because they lack involvement of the hand, eye, brain and understanding of the artist – the true creative process.  And I mean involvement with the subject-matter, not the photographic process.

About which, more next time
Patricia


Art and the Movies

Eros_mod - Patricia HowittTime to move on from London to Scotland.  But first, a couple more connections, because these are the start of more of life’s threads.

They earliest thing I can recall about doing art was drawing a kiddy house as a square with a pointed roof, four windows and a door.  The usual standard tot’s drawing. 

When I drew the pathway as two straight parallel lines going downwards from the door to the bottom of the page, my dad showed me how to draw a winding path in perspective, wider at the bottom than the top and with a couple of sinuous bends on the way – looking like it was lying on the ground and not sticking up in the air. 

What a revelation, at that young age!  What a foundation for future interests in architecture, model houses, and landscapes, haha!

Architecture Sketchbook - Patricia Howitt

Architecture Sketchbook, Castles and Churches – Patricia Howitt

So began a long “collaboration” on art between us.  And though there were times when I was right properly irked by his input, I know I owe my dad an enormous debt for what he passed on to me over the years.  Where HE got his knowledge from, I have no idea.

Art at School

When we moved from Chelsea Barracks to Kennington, London, I attended the girls’ side of the boys’ prep school for Dulwich College for a short time.  It’s a pity that in those days kids were not encouraged to keep their artwork.  Hopefully things are different today – it’s important to start building your portfolio as young as possible, and.parents need to know this, too.

Anyway, the one piece of art that sticks in memory from that school was a shaded pencil drawing I did of a goose that was sent off somewhere to an exhibition and to be critiqued by the mysterious “powers that be”.  I was told it got awarded some kind of distinction, but I got no record of it, and the work never came back to me.  Wish I had it now.

Sparrow Sketches 1 - Patricia Howitt

Sparrow Sketchbook – Patricia Howitt

Real, live animals didn’t come into the equation in those days – living the nomadic army life doesn’t lend itself to relationships with pets, or long-term friends either, unfortunately. 

Army Brats

I’m sure thousands of  army brats (gee what a phrase – who ever got to be a brat with a Guards RSM, or any other army NCO for a parent?)  know exactly what I’m talking about.  On the one hand, you get enough exposure to the wide world to kill parochialism stone dead  for life (thank goodness!). On the other hand, you find it hard to conceive that ANYTHING (especially friendships and relationships) can be lasting. 

It’s a lonely world, especially if you’re an only child and forbidden to play with “ranks’ kids”.  In my early years, I had only one real friend – the son of one of my dad’s NCO associates.  Nowadays, animals are some of my favorite subjects, as well as my best friends.  And it’s that goose drawing that stuck in memory over the years.

The Movies – Walt Disney

Movies were another major influence.  Just off Piccadilly Circus there was a small picture theater that ran continuous Walt Disney cartoon movies. Whether it still exists, I really don’t know. At any time of the day you could buy a ticket and wander in there and stay as long as you liked watching Donald Duck and Mickey Mouse. We went there quite often and I can still vividly recall watching Donald Duck especially – oh man that attitude and that voice!  It wasn’t until I got real live ducks of my own only a few years ago that I realized what a great duck impersonation Donald really does.

It was all just entertainment.. At six or seven years of age, there was for me no critical appreciation of what we were looking at – the colorful antics on screen were just something to laugh at and enjoy.   But this first brush with Walt Disney was going to develop into a relationship that would impact on skills to come.

Sparrow Sketch Book 2 - Patricia Howitt

Sparrow Sketchbook 2 – Patricia Howitt

About which, more next time!
Patricia


A Daughter of the Regiment

Sherwood Foresters - Patricia HowittOh yes – and a granddaughter of it, too.  Ken’s father, William Ernest Howitt, had also been RSM of the 1st Battalion Scots Guards before him, and he too had artistic talent. 

When my dad ran away from home to join the Guards, he tried to escape the influence of his father’s name on his own career by enlisting in the Coldstreams.  Short-lived dream: the enrolling officers in the Coldstream Guards knew the name Howitt all too well and shunted him off to the Scots Guards real fast.  It was a tradition that sons should follow in their father’s regiment.

Now my grandfather’s mother, Georgiana Howitt (nee Hewitt – Yes!), ran a cab yard at the top of Normanton Road, Derby, England, where I was born.  This involved taxi services, funeral services (all horse-drawn), and a hostelry, or inn. Though she had brothers, it was she who took the business over from her father.  So horses run deep in the family.

The Cab and Handsome

“Handsome” Horse Portrait (on the right)

I used to hear family talk about “the cab yard” from time to time.  It was many years before I got to the bottom of what it was all about.  Not until of my own volition I started riding horses – and wishing I’d learned earlier in life.

To keep her only son out of trouble – and probably to give herself time to run her business – Georgiana packed him off at an early age to live with relatives in Heanor, a small mining and textiles town about 8 miles north-east of Derby.  In that rural environment he labored, did carpentry, found time to paint and sharpened his skills with horses.  As a result I believe he became senior riding instructor at Sandhurst for awhile. He was also an outstanding soldier.

William Erenest Howitt - Scots Guards

My grandfather fought as an NCO with the Scots Guards in the trenches in France in World War l and was severely gassed.  His batman saved his life, and he returned home, to be invalided out of the Guards and into the Sherwood Foresters (now part of the Mercian Regiment of the British Army).

Sherwood Forest – now THERE’S a name that rings through family history down the generations – of which, more to follow later.

My grandfather died when I was still a toddler.  I can remember he used to call me ‘Poppy’, and I remember his roses, his woodworking shed and the aviaries at the bottom of his garden. I dearly wish I had got to know him.  Aside from roses, his love was finches, budgies and canaries. As a sideline, I have bred rare breeds poultry.  That kind of came upon me and I didn’t think of the connection when I first got started …

Sparrow and Aviary

Sparrow – Graphite Pencil (on the left)

When my aunt, Ena May Howitt (my father’s twin), died in Boston USA in 1983, my mother and I went over to clear up her estate.  I hoped above all that I might find some of grandpa’s paintings from the Heanor days.  I’d heard about them – especially one of a water mill at Heanor – and I clung to the dream that they might have been in my aunt’s house in the States.

Well, I came home with heaps of family photos and stuff – but no paintings. The only artwork I have of his are a pair of beautifully painted Scots Guards crests – one for each of his twins, with their names hand-lettered underneath.  They are very dear to me.

W E Howitt & K M Howitt

Among my aunt’s belongings I found my grandfather’s Regular Army Certificate of Service – another of those slim red books.  It came home with me to join my father’s.  

Once again, history repeats itself …   The Final Assessment of Conduct & Character, completed personally in the handwriting of his CO, Major A A Sims, was : “Exemplary”.

Peace,
Patricia


An Artist’s Journeys in Nature

London - Patricia HowittI need to start this journey – and it must be called a journey, as you will see – far away from the wilds of New Zealand.

It begins in the City of London, right in Regents Street.  It was there in one of the greatest and busiest cities of the world that a very small girl found her favorite haunt on the top floor of a wonderful toy shop – was it Hamleys or Gammages?

My mom, dad and I were living in Chelsea Barracks close to the Thames and Big Ben. Even as a small child I got used to looking for the light on top of Big Ben that showed Parliament was sitting.

London - Big Ben - Lighted

We were part way through a whirlwind of army life.  I realized later at the age of 16 I had lived in 16 different houses scattered through the country in towns as far apart as Derby, Caterham, Aldershot, Windsor, London and Aberdeen.

What I didn’t know then was that much more travel was to follow.

In fact, it was some years before it dawned on me that travel was (and still is) the always recurring theme in my dreams. Whatever else appears In my sleep, I am usually going somewhere, traveling along a road or trying to find my way…   Journeying.

Model Railway – Hamleys or Gammages?

Back to Model Railways. We used to frequent both Hamleys and Gammages.  In all of those enormous stores, with all their floors and dazzling displays of toys, my favorite place was right up on the mezzanine under the roof where the toy trains lived in – I think it was Gammages.  Strange that it wasn’t the dolls departments – or even the teddy bears.  I much preferred teddy bears to dolls, which I didn’t have much time for.  But no, it wasn’t even the teddy bear department that drew me like a magnet.  It was the model trains. 

I could have stayed for hours – and probably did – watching the trains come and go, walking around the huge oval model railway display that circled right round the balustrade of the mezzanine floor.  In and out of the little stations they clattered, along the winding tracks, through the tunnels in the hilly landscape.  YES – those hills: for some unexplained reason, they had a fascination for me.  Gammages’ train tracks were beautifully landscaped and I was fascinated by the green, paper mache sculptured landforms that made the journeys of those little trains such a joy to watch.

Gouland Downs Pencil - Patricia Howitt

I always wanted a train set.  I never got one, and in all truth if I had, it would probably have been a disappointment. Without all those wonderful hills and tunnels, I doubt that it would have really satisfied.

My dad with his artistic skills could have made a landscape for me – if he had the time.  I remember an indoor target range he made for the London Scottish regiment with a green landscape made of plywood flats where tanks and other targets appeared and disappeared, running on hidden rails between the hills – quite like the trains, in fact. The night he took me to see that still sticks in my memory.

I was a city girl, born into a Brigade of Guards family, used to living in barracks around London and Windsor and used to hearing my father drilling troops on the square daily.   The only hills I had seen were on train journeys between Derby and London – visiting my dad before we moved up to London to live with him in barracks – and of course at Gammages. Now, I am a lover of steam railways and vintage British Rail Posters.

Then when I was 8 we moved from London to Aberdeen, living initially in a suburb on the edge of town and later moving to the village of Peterculter, on the Deeside road to Balmoral.  There I had my first encounter with cows – right over the fence of the small house we lived in. The hills didn’t make any great impression though – that was to come later.

Peace,
Patricia