An Artist's Journeys in Nature

Posts tagged “movies

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Mars Ares Drawing - Patricia HowittCinemascope had hit the big screen. And my mom and I went to see “The Robe” from 20th Century Fox.

Aside from Disney, of any film I ever saw, this film had by far the widest and most lasting impact on me.  I had already been studying Latin at school from quite young (thanks to that great Scottish education), and I found it rather dry.

Now for the first time, the Roman world began to come alive. I bought the book, The Robe by Lloyd C Douglas, was fascinated by it, and started taking an interest in the Romans and their culture.

Menenius Agrippa & Boxer Drawings - Patricia Howitt

Menenius Agrippa Sculpture & Roman Boxer Drawings

More than that though, I got a crush on the movie’s leading man, Richard Burton.  Ah me – the effect of getting a teenage crush!  But it was a very good thing for creativity, all the same!

Doing the usual teenage girl crush stuff of finding out more about Burton’s career led me into the world of Shakespeare at The Old Vic, Alexander the Great, The Dark Tower by Louis MacNeice, Dylan Thomas’s Under Milk Wood, Coleridge’s Rime of The Ancient Mariner, and some of Christopher Fry’s plays. This new world I stumbled upon had an exciting richness of spirit.   Shakespeare took on new life, and I began to look at literature with different eyes.

All of this impacted on my art – especially Alexander the Great : the door on Classical Greek Art and Architecture was opened for the first time.  That was hugely valuable, because Greek sculpture taught me a lot about anatomy – along with a couple of books I got for Christmas presents. I spent some hours drawing anatomical studies from pictures of Greek pieces (didn’t they used to do that in Art School? – never thought of THAT at the time!)

Heracles & Warrior - Patricia Howitt

Greek Warrior Sculpture and Heracles Vase Drawings

The human body is arguably the hardest thing to render convincingly in art.  Quite a number of people doing art struggle noticeably in that area, though the Photoshop ‘Artists’ just grab photos of models, and solve their problem that way. And they call it ‘Art’?  Ha!  Which goes to show : the good old Art School disciplines – canned in this modern age of ‘permissive everything’ – had some great value, after all!

A couple of years ago, I picked up the B/W drawing at the head of this post and worked it into a full color art piece.  Click on the image for larger size and more details:

Ares Mars - God of War : Patricia Howitt

Ares / Mars – God of War Drawing

Done from a Roman sculpture – this is the most ornate helmet I’ve ever set eyes on : isn’t it gorgeous?

Patricia

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Alice in Wonderland – the Cartoon Comic and the Animated Movie

Cheshire Cat Disney ImageAt some point Mickey Mouse Weekly Comic began serializing Disney’s “Alice in Wonderland” cartoon film on its back page.

Wow -I fell in love with that, of course.  It’s interesting that of all Disney’s works available at the time, “Alice in Wonderland” was richest in landscape, as well as characters.  And what a landscape it was!  Lush parks, deep forest, the Walrus and the Carpenter’s moonlit beach, the White Rabbit’s house and garden, the Mad Hatter’s tea party garden, the Queen’s maze and croquet lawn – what richness of imagery and color Disney unleashed on the world in that movie!

I know most people prefer “Cinderella”, but for me “Alice in Wonderland” was definitely the tops, and I think that had a lot to do with the landscape settings, especially Tulgey Wood, which somehow totally hooked me in.  Even today, pictures of the Tulgey Wood scenes have a powerful appeal and bring back some very strong memories.

Apart from Elleston Trevor’s “Deep Wood” tales which I loved, I didn’t have much experience of forests – none at all of real forests, that is. So there’s no obvious, immediate connection.  Perhaps it’s relevant that while the Tulgey Wood settings were based on forest reality, the colors and shapes of the trees had an other-worldliness that generated an enormous fascination.  And while they were kind of wild, they were also orderly and groomed. Not full-on wild, like the forests I came to know later in New Zealand.

Tulgey Wood Disney Cartoon Images

Tulgey Wood Disney Cartoon Images

Tulgey Wood invited further exploration, without being too threatening. You could see pathways and openings that beckoned. This forest has depth.  And of course the ‘extras’ – the owl, the frogs, the horn ducks and the momeraths – all of these added enormously to its appeal.  And the art was great.  The super-realism of this tree trunk setting is something else:

Tulgey Wood Owl - Disney

Tulgey Wood Owl – Disney Animation

And then – maybe it was the Elleston Trevor books, or even that old “Sherwood Forest” thing in the blood.    One of the meanings of the surname Howitt or Hewitt (we have a double dose – both surnames are in the family) is thought to be a topographic derivation from the Olde English ‘Hiewett’ – which translates as ‘a place where trees have been cut down’.

Forest dwellers?   Foresters?  Who knows?  I think we carry more programming from our ancestry than we give credit for.  Here’s something that surfaced from my subconscious many years later :

Forest Apparition - Patricia Howitt

Forest Apparition – Acrylic – Patricia Howitt

On top of my CD towers sits a little stuffed Disney Cheshire Cat toy that I found lying in the street a few years ago, shortly after our local McDonald’s opened its doors for the first time. They were giving away little toys to kids. Sadly, some child was the poorer for my gain – but I’d like to think he came into my hands because in the long run, he carries a whole lot more meaning for me than he could for any child in today’s world of ever-changing toy fads…

The cartoon movie stills in this post are all Copyright  Walt Disney Corporation.  Thanks mainly to Lenny at Alice in Wonderland.net .

Patricia


Art and the Movies

Eros_mod - Patricia HowittTime to move on from London to Scotland.  But first, a couple more connections, because these are the start of more of life’s threads.

They earliest thing I can recall about doing art was drawing a kiddy house as a square with a pointed roof, four windows and a door.  The usual standard tot’s drawing. 

When I drew the pathway as two straight parallel lines going downwards from the door to the bottom of the page, my dad showed me how to draw a winding path in perspective, wider at the bottom than the top and with a couple of sinuous bends on the way – looking like it was lying on the ground and not sticking up in the air. 

What a revelation, at that young age!  What a foundation for future interests in architecture, model houses, and landscapes, haha!

Architecture Sketchbook - Patricia Howitt

Architecture Sketchbook, Castles and Churches – Patricia Howitt

So began a long “collaboration” on art between us.  And though there were times when I was right properly irked by his input, I know I owe my dad an enormous debt for what he passed on to me over the years.  Where HE got his knowledge from, I have no idea.

Art at School

When we moved from Chelsea Barracks to Kennington, London, I attended the girls’ side of the boys’ prep school for Dulwich College for a short time.  It’s a pity that in those days kids were not encouraged to keep their artwork.  Hopefully things are different today – it’s important to start building your portfolio as young as possible, and.parents need to know this, too.

Anyway, the one piece of art that sticks in memory from that school was a shaded pencil drawing I did of a goose that was sent off somewhere to an exhibition and to be critiqued by the mysterious “powers that be”.  I was told it got awarded some kind of distinction, but I got no record of it, and the work never came back to me.  Wish I had it now.

Sparrow Sketches 1 - Patricia Howitt

Sparrow Sketchbook – Patricia Howitt

Real, live animals didn’t come into the equation in those days – living the nomadic army life doesn’t lend itself to relationships with pets, or long-term friends either, unfortunately. 

Army Brats

I’m sure thousands of  army brats (gee what a phrase – who ever got to be a brat with a Guards RSM, or any other army NCO for a parent?)  know exactly what I’m talking about.  On the one hand, you get enough exposure to the wide world to kill parochialism stone dead  for life (thank goodness!). On the other hand, you find it hard to conceive that ANYTHING (especially friendships and relationships) can be lasting. 

It’s a lonely world, especially if you’re an only child and forbidden to play with “ranks’ kids”.  In my early years, I had only one real friend – the son of one of my dad’s NCO associates.  Nowadays, animals are some of my favorite subjects, as well as my best friends.  And it’s that goose drawing that stuck in memory over the years.

The Movies – Walt Disney

Movies were another major influence.  Just off Piccadilly Circus there was a small picture theater that ran continuous Walt Disney cartoon movies. Whether it still exists, I really don’t know. At any time of the day you could buy a ticket and wander in there and stay as long as you liked watching Donald Duck and Mickey Mouse. We went there quite often and I can still vividly recall watching Donald Duck especially – oh man that attitude and that voice!  It wasn’t until I got real live ducks of my own only a few years ago that I realized what a great duck impersonation Donald really does.

It was all just entertainment.. At six or seven years of age, there was for me no critical appreciation of what we were looking at – the colorful antics on screen were just something to laugh at and enjoy.   But this first brush with Walt Disney was going to develop into a relationship that would impact on skills to come.

Sparrow Sketch Book 2 - Patricia Howitt

Sparrow Sketchbook 2 – Patricia Howitt

About which, more next time!
Patricia