An Artist's Journeys in Nature

Scotland

The Big Decision

Future Shock - Acrylic - Patricia HowittAt the age of 13 in the Scottish educational system, a pupil has to make the choice of what they want to do in life. Obviously a very big decision, quite hard to make at a relatively young age: I don’t know if things are the same now.

The options for me were Languages, Science and Art.

I wasn’t in any doubt what I wanted to do and it was called Art.

But here’s where one of life’s major disappointments reared its head: my father’s response was a flat, “No! You will never make a living at art. Keep it as a hobby and enjoy it.”

Hobby? Aaargh!

Burnout - Oils on Board - Patricia Howitt

This was painted later in life, after I moved to Wellington to work as a lawyer.  But it reflects the desolate feelings I had earlier – plus my grief at devastation of nature.  Click on image for more details.

Looking back, I can understand his reaction at that time, but it sure was hard on me.  What’s more, I was also very good at both languages and science.  It wasn’t as if art was my only option. So I didn’t have that leg to stand on.

One doesn’t argue with an RSM, especially my father.  With a great deal of sadness, I decided to go for languages.

There was nothing else to do but carry on …

The Bleeding of The Land - Acrylic - Patricia Howitt

The Bleeding of The Land – Acrylic – Patricia Howitt

This is another later painting and it’s worth clicking on the image for a fuller explanation of what’s behind it.

My dad’s comment impacted very heavily on my mind for far too long, and I am only just now beginning to shake it off.  What’s more, I never until very recently fully forgave him for what he’d said because as I grew older, and especially lately, I became so very aware what a strong influence it had on my thinking and choices since.

Though I sold quite a lot of art all through my legal career, I found I had indeed a very deep belief that I’d never make a living at it. How deep that belief was, I only discovered when I quit my job and moved up north here – about which, more later.  It seemed like I would never shake off the stigma (as I saw it) of not having been to Art School.

Parents: Be careful about what you say to your kids – especially about their dreams.  Select your words carefully.

Patricia


More Classics

Greek Vase Painting - Patricia HowittOf course, it wasn’t too long before a “Movies” scrapbook got started.

It was  mainly for movies about Greece and Rome, and I combed the magazine stands for movie magazines with reviews on anything new in the genre.

Today, things haven’t really changed.  The Internet is a wonderful medium for making “scrapbooks”, and we create them all the time – be it in blogs or static websites, with photos, artwork or videos.  It’s really great to catch up legitimately with an old hobby in a new format – without feeling ‘wussy’ !

And naturally, there had to be more artworks …Alexander & Caryatids Drawings - Patricia Howitt

The Masters of Greek Vase Painting

The other thing I frequently go back to in wonderment is Greek vase painting. I love the limited palettes, the brilliant composition, the strong but sensitive lines.  These artists were indeed masters:

Greek Vase Art 1

Greek Vase Art 2

And a little tribute of mine:

Ganymede & Heracles - Patricia Howitt

But the Greek Vase painters didn’t have it all on their own – more next time!

Patricia


The Third Dimension

Sculpture - K M HowittThe instruction I got from my dad went a whole lot further than drawing and painting. Sculpture was his own preferred medium, so naturally he got me involved in that, as a first priority.

He was experimenting with molding and casting processes and it wasn’t long before I was learning the techniques of creating low-relief and three-dimensional sculpture in plasticine and making plaster of paris molds to produce master casts – mostly in plaster of paris also.

My dad had his own very strong sculpture style, which he passed on to me. Usually it was full of cutbacks and tricky shapes, so we started off making waste molds of plaster of paris.  With free-standing sculptures, these molds had to have more than one part.

Mold Making

Plaster of Paris Mold Parts

I learned how to box in the original and use either shims or gravity to make molds in several pieces, keyed into each other. Then to take the cast, we used vaseline as the parting agent before pouring plaster into plaster.  Scary!

The end job of breaking the mold away from the hardened master inside it with a hammer and chisel was always an exciting and tricky business – sometimes fraught with accidents. There was always patching and sanding to do afterwards.

Making molds is a lot easier process today, even though the fundamentals are still the same.  True, you could get rubber molding agents then, but they had to be poured hot – an impossibility with a plasticine original – hence the need to create a durable master cast to work from.

I came away from that early period with several pieces of my own and a wealth of experience.

Spaniel & Tiger Sculptures - Patricia Hoiwitt

Spaniel & Tiger Sculpture Casts – Unfinished

I realize now these early beginnings were a real gift – something else that has never left me.

Ballet Sculpture - Patricia Howitt

Ballet Sculpture Original in Plasticine

A few years ago, I took up sculpture again and found the molding and casting fundamentals I’d learned as a youngster were still there. They stood me in good stead working alone, even though the materials have changed (for the better) over the years.

It’s now most common to use cold-pouring, two-pot molding material, of course, and after a day of instruction at a bronze foundry I was able to adapt my techniques to make ‘rubber’ molds within a supporting plaster jacket very successfully. Thank you, Ken.

More later…

Patricia


Art and School 2

Artistic endeavors in the classroom were not limited to painting and drawing. We were encouraged to pour our creativity into other craft subjects as well.

We were doing embroidery, and creating designs for that. I can clearly remember a tea cosy I made early on with a dragon design on it, that kept our teapot warm for a number of years, until a teapot warmer was no longer needed.

We did some leather work, and I still have the writing compendium I made as one of my projects – There was also a purse for keys, with a big sculpted key on the front of it, made from the same piece of leather.  That wore out!

Writing Compendium - Patricia Howitt

Writing Compendium, Leather – Crafts at School

At one point, the class had to create a series of dioramas to illustrate a historical novel we were reading – it was Walter Scott’s “The Fortunes of Nigel“. The group I was in drew the ‘street scene’, and I found myself in charge of proceedings, making a cobbled pavements out of split lentils, 16th Century half-timbered houses out of cardboard and little people out of painted clay. Creativity on a roll.
I think our scene was the best of the 3, but then I would say that…   (Please excuse old photos but thought I must show them.)

Diorama - The Fortunes of Nigel

Diorama – The Fortunes of Nigel : Crafts at School

Here are a couple more of my stamp album and scrapbook illustrations – a Readers Digest train illustration copy on the left, and the herald on the right was inspired by some of Ron Embleton’s great work for Strongbow the Mighty:

Train and Herald - Patricia Howitt

Train and Medieval Herald Illustrations

Next time – “The Third Dimension”.

Patricia


Art and School

I had arrived in Still Life Bottle Painting - Patricia HowittScotland with a perfect BBC accent. Aberdonians are very Scottish, very patriotic, egalitarian and up-front. No place to be talking like a London radio announcer, as I soon found out.  That BBC accent disappeared very quickly.

My new school was the High School for Girls in Aberdeen, now Harlaw Academy where pupils gain the advantage of a great Scottish education. I was there for 8 years in total – my longest term at any school by a long shot.  In spite of our continual house moving though, my parents had always made sure I got the best possible schooling.  This settled period at an excellent school occurred at just the right time in my education.

Outside of school, I started off making scrapbooks of pictures I liked, embellished with painted artwork and lettering, drawing on ideas from magazines and books.  My stamp album got the same treatment.  And though with some of these ideas I was copying from existing artwork or photos, I’ve come to appreciate that the discipline of doing that started to train my eye really well.

Tiger - Indian Dancers - Patricia Howitt

Leaping Tiger and Indian Dancers Illustrations

The leaping tiger was an icon used by Esso Petroleum at the time.

Getting close to pipe band competitions on Scottish soil inspired a pencil study of a Highland dancer, drawn from a photo in the local newspaper – I’m glad I have that.  Not many people outside of Scotland realize that Highland dancing is actually an excellent fitness training.  Traditionally, in Highland Regiments the soldiers did PT and the officers did Highland Dancing, to stay fit.  Highland dancing is something I loved at school and would take up again, if there were any close to me – I was always happy when we walked into the gym and saw the pianist sitting at the piano!

Highland Fling Drawing - Patricia Howitt

Helmet Illustration and Highland Fling Drawing

The sword and helmet design was also an embellishment in one of my scrapbooks.

Still Life Bottle & Vase Paintings - Patricia Howitt

Still Life Bottle & Vase Paintings – School Art

There was plenty of Art at school in the early days –  I still have one or two of the many things we created in art classes.  Of course, we were given the usual array of still life subjects, but it seems at some stage our art teacher got creative and found something especially taxing for us to focus on:

They’re actually quite tricky subjects, and I’m glad to have these two paintings still – mainly because I used the backs of them for designing something else. (It’s called keeping a portfolio -Haha!)  They would have been done in my early teens.

As we got to the higher classes, we were encouraged to produce black and white ink illustrations for use in the annual school magazine.

My first was of Alice in Wonderland, drinking from the bottle and holding her hand on the top of her head to see if she was growing any taller. No prizes for guessing where that idea came from, but I remember especially the art teacher’s help and encouragement in creating it.  I know it was accepted for the magazine, and so were a couple more in later years.

I wish I still had those magazines…

Parents – keep your kids’ art stuff!

Patricia


Alice in Wonderland – the Cartoon Comic and the Animated Movie

Cheshire Cat Disney ImageAt some point Mickey Mouse Weekly Comic began serializing Disney’s “Alice in Wonderland” cartoon film on its back page.

Wow -I fell in love with that, of course.  It’s interesting that of all Disney’s works available at the time, “Alice in Wonderland” was richest in landscape, as well as characters.  And what a landscape it was!  Lush parks, deep forest, the Walrus and the Carpenter’s moonlit beach, the White Rabbit’s house and garden, the Mad Hatter’s tea party garden, the Queen’s maze and croquet lawn – what richness of imagery and color Disney unleashed on the world in that movie!

I know most people prefer “Cinderella”, but for me “Alice in Wonderland” was definitely the tops, and I think that had a lot to do with the landscape settings, especially Tulgey Wood, which somehow totally hooked me in.  Even today, pictures of the Tulgey Wood scenes have a powerful appeal and bring back some very strong memories.

Apart from Elleston Trevor’s “Deep Wood” tales which I loved, I didn’t have much experience of forests – none at all of real forests, that is. So there’s no obvious, immediate connection.  Perhaps it’s relevant that while the Tulgey Wood settings were based on forest reality, the colors and shapes of the trees had an other-worldliness that generated an enormous fascination.  And while they were kind of wild, they were also orderly and groomed. Not full-on wild, like the forests I came to know later in New Zealand.

Tulgey Wood Disney Cartoon Images

Tulgey Wood Disney Cartoon Images

Tulgey Wood invited further exploration, without being too threatening. You could see pathways and openings that beckoned. This forest has depth.  And of course the ‘extras’ – the owl, the frogs, the horn ducks and the momeraths – all of these added enormously to its appeal.  And the art was great.  The super-realism of this tree trunk setting is something else:

Tulgey Wood Owl - Disney

Tulgey Wood Owl – Disney Animation

And then – maybe it was the Elleston Trevor books, or even that old “Sherwood Forest” thing in the blood.    One of the meanings of the surname Howitt or Hewitt (we have a double dose – both surnames are in the family) is thought to be a topographic derivation from the Olde English ‘Hiewett’ – which translates as ‘a place where trees have been cut down’.

Forest dwellers?   Foresters?  Who knows?  I think we carry more programming from our ancestry than we give credit for.  Here’s something that surfaced from my subconscious many years later :

Forest Apparition - Patricia Howitt

Forest Apparition – Acrylic – Patricia Howitt

On top of my CD towers sits a little stuffed Disney Cheshire Cat toy that I found lying in the street a few years ago, shortly after our local McDonald’s opened its doors for the first time. They were giving away little toys to kids. Sadly, some child was the poorer for my gain – but I’d like to think he came into my hands because in the long run, he carries a whole lot more meaning for me than he could for any child in today’s world of ever-changing toy fads…

The cartoon movie stills in this post are all Copyright  Walt Disney Corporation.  Thanks mainly to Lenny at Alice in Wonderland.net .

Patricia


Strongbow the Mighty – Cartoon Comic

Strongbow The Mighty CartoonApart from the straight Disney content, there was one other cartoon strip in Mickey Mouse Weekly that I came to rate just as highly  – a cartoon called Strongbow the Mighty, illustrated by another real master of his trade – the London-born illustrator Ron Embleton. Ron created a huge body of artwork pretty much single-handed, in a really short space of time.

Ron was in a league of his own, and it shocked me since to find out that at the time he was doing Strongbow, he was only in his early twenties, having started illustrating for comics at the age of 17  – amazing.  I still have 37 Strongbow comic pages stashed away and kept over the years because I admired his work so much, and once I get my scanner going again, I’ll put them online, because I notice there doesn’t seem to be anything much out there about this particular comic strip.

Meantime, I’ve set up a page at Patricia Howitt.com with one or two Strongbow images, which I’m sure will be relished by those who remember the cartoon – and by anyone with an eye for outstanding graphics.  Here are a couple of them:

Strongbow The Mighty Cartoon Frames

Strongbow The Mighty Cartoon Illustrations by Ron Embleton

I loved Strongbow for Ron’s marvellous, crisp black and white images, his detail, his strength of line and composition (again!), the brilliant accuracy of his men and horses, and above all his total mastery when it came to capturing power and movement.

My dad and I used to pore over his pages, marvelling at his rendering of horses and men, often frozen in a split second of violent action,  but fluid, powerful and graceful nonetheless. Very, very powerful stuff.

Now I’ve had the chance to see more of Ron’s work, I’ve a sneaking feeling that the Strongbow era might have been one of his favorites, because the images he created for it are so complete and so satisfying. Ron captured the spirit of that period so vividly, that it’s hard for me to realise that he was also engaged with Biggles (another of my favourites), American Wild West, science fiction and Playboy magazine.  What an artist!

Ron Embleton Medieval Castle

Ron Embleton Medieval Castle Book Illustration

Strongbow, as far as I remember, was only ever a black and white comic strip. I saw some of Ron Embleton’s color work in comics recently when I searched him on the net, but to be honest, I think black and white conveys his mastery of comic strip work far more effectively. Having said that, he also had brilliant control of tone and color, and produced many individual images that are truly breathtaking.  It was a real joy to me recently to find a great body of his illustration work for book publishers that I previously hadn’t known about – see above.

The other thing that appealed about Strongbow was the “Robin Hood.”quality of the story. As I’ve said before, Sherwood Forest has some deep resonances in our family history, that I wasn’t even aware of at the time. That will surface later, though.

Peace,

Patricia