An Artist's Journeys in Nature

Posts tagged “painting

Summer Anchorage

This artwork inspired a design for a Dynomighty Mighty Wallet that’s most appropriate for the approaching Northern Hemisphere summer.

The location is on the coast about 20 miles north of here – a very picturesque fishing village where the street runs alongside the retaining wall above the beach.

Mature pohutukawa trees line the roadside, and cars can park in their shade and enjoy the vista of yachts anchored in the harbor and fishing boats going to and fro the adjacent wharf.

For the wallet, I homed in on the yacht and distant hills over the harbor:

For more details about prints, products and the Mighty Wallet, click on the respective images above.

Have a great summer!

Patricia
Design collection at Dynomighty

 

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The Mountain Returns

ngauruhoe2-riconThe mountains of the Central North Island Plateau (Tongariro National Park) have had a place in my heart since the mid 1970’s.  This majestic wilderness landscape is now part of a Dual Status World Heritage Site – a status that recognises the park’s important Maori spiritual/cultural associations as well as its outstanding volcanic features.

I spent time on the Plateau on several occasions in the 70’s, travelling up from Wellington and staying in one or another of the DOC and Club huts around the mountains.  I’ve painted, walked and beginner ski’d up there and the mystery, power and spirituality of the location have never left me in all the years since I moved away from Wellington.

Ngauruhoe_700

At about 9000′ above sea level, this location is the summit of the North Island.  All around, the land falls away, and the quality of light and clarity of the air have a huge spiritual impact, even aside from the wonderful scatter of volcanic peaks and craters that makes up the topography of the plateau itself.

As it happens, in June 2013 I took my first flight in many years from Kerikeri via Auckland to Christchurch to attend the NZ Post Children’s Book Awards ceremony.  By some miracle, I managed to get a glimpse of the snow-clad peak of Mt Ngauruhoe standing out from the sea of white cloud, on the other side of the plane as we passed over the Plateau.  It was a sad, fleeting moment:  I now live at the northernmost end of the North Island, about 450 miles away…

orotere

I should state clearly that I love the place where I live now (above) – about 10 acres on a hillside below yet another volcanic outcrop.  My parents bought it in 1970, I visited regularly and worked with them on the land, and since 1987 I have lived here.  However, the winter of 2014 (June-August) turned out prolonged and very wet, and all of a sudden I realised that the time has come for me to move.  I need less land, less humidity and a new adventure.

But where to go?  Not just anywhere will do!  It wasn’t very long before that answer came.

By chance in September 2014 as I was idly glancing through a travel supplement to the NZ Herald, I saw an article about Ohakune – a small town on the main trunk line about 12 miles south-west of Mt Ruapehu as the crow flies.  It services one of Mt Ruapehu’s skifields – Turoa.  I visited it years ago, and was intrigued to read how the town has developed since.  Some Internet research followed and I am now working through the major task of preparing myself to move.  It will probably take a little time for me to pull this off, but the promise of being back near those mountains will ease the regrets I’m likely to have about leaving my present home.

Patricia


Ruapehu Sunset

ruapehu-riconJust a brief post about another antecedent to “The Journey“.

Back when I lived in Hamilton, I painted a very loose watercolor-style acrylic of Mt Ruapehu from those photos I took at Mangaturuturu Hut – and looking at it again, I realise this actually formed an even closer antecedent to the Journey 1 painting in my previous post.

The picture sold very quickly, and I now have only a very small photo of it left, which I’ve had to work on somewhat to make it presentable for the net.

And the result gives a very much truer impression of the ‘pink jelly’ effect of that magical mountain…ruapehu-sunset-700 Patricia


The Journey

baggage-riconBy way of asserting my independence from all the non-art claptrap that has invaded my life in the last couple of years, I made myself do something I haven’t had time for in quite awhile – exhibit.

In fact, the last time I exhibited was in 2000, before my mother began to get really sick.

To coincide with Matariki – or the rising of the Pleiades (more later), some really enterprising locals held an art exhibition in our small town in late June 2015 – the first local art show ever, I think.

Having gone through the initial panic of ‘nothing to wear’, which for an artist translates as, “Help!  I’ve got nothing that’s ready to be hung”  (like: not framed, no fixings, not quite finished etc etc), I managed to dredge up 7 pieces.

One of which was “The Journey 1” – intended as the start of a new series and just recently finished:

journey_700

The inspiration for this picture goes back to my days in government in Wellington, to a long weekend in 1975 when a friend and I took a workmate up to Mangaturuturu Hut on Mount Ruapehu.

At about 4pm, the mountain (given the right weather conditions) turns a magnificent shade of pink.  I took the photos below from the hut and I used them as a reference for this work, along with an old shot of Peter, taken in the Kaimanawas by one of his mates, as an inspiration for the pose of the figure.

ruapehu-pink

Peter, who is still in Wellington, often says he needs to go in the hills from time to time to get ‘grounded’ – which is part of what this painting is about.  Maybe I don’t need to ‘connect’ so much now, because I live on the edge of a bush reserve, but I DO miss those mountains.

And the big bag (which you’ll note isn’t a tramping or hiking backpack) is there for a purpose.

Billy Joel’s ‘River Of Dreams’ has relevance here, too:

See also my follow-up post ‘Ruapehu Sunset‘.

Patricia


‘Unfolding’ – Botanical Art

Fern Frond Unfolding - PencilStill working on items for Society6, so here’s another.

It’s based on the New Zealand ‘Kiokio’ fern – one of the Blechnums : Blechnum capense.  They often grow on  banks, and the fronds can reach quite a size – often 2 or 3 feet long.  They look like great green waterfalls.

Where there is plenty of sun falling on them, the tips of the fronds take on an orangey hue.

The interesting thing about this genus is that its fertile, spore-bearing fronds are a distinctly different shape from its normal fronds.

I’ve brought this out in the painting – the fertile frond is shown in white silhouette behind the normal frond unfurling.

kiokio_450


Here in New Zealand, any kind of unfolding fern frond or ‘koru’ is regarded as a symbol of new beginnings, development and growth.  For me, it is also a symbol of enormous power.  A botanical magnifying glass reveals some mighty wonders!

Click on image for more details.

Patricia


Flight of The Kukupa

Kereru-kukupaHere’s a follow-on from my last post, as I’m busy putting up new items on Society6.

This is a painting of a NZ native pigeon (Hemiphaga novaeseelandiae), the Kereru, or as they’re called up here the Kukupa, soaring above the volcanic outcrop where I live.

They are quite a large bird, with very distinctive and beautiful coloring, the breast pure white, the head, neck, back and wings green of varying hues with purple and grey intermingled.  They have quite a heavy flight, although their nuptual flights in spring are quite spectacular.  A pair produces only one chick a year, so it it doesn’t take much brain to see how easily numbers become depleted.

Sadly, this bird is becoming scarce here because although they are protected, certain people think they have the right to take them for food.

Flight of The Kereru - Acrylic - Patricia Howitt

Flight of the Kukupa or Kereru – Native New Zealand Pigeon

When my parents moved in here about 40 years ago, and for many years after, the kukupa native woodpigeon could be seen in numbers swooping and soaring over the thermals from the warm rock face.

Nowadays, thanks to attention from some people, they are so depleted in numbers that I rarely see one in the bush, let alone up on the rock. The irony of it is that according to Maori tradition, the area behind this rock, known as ‘Kukuparere’ was fabled to be the place where ALL the Kereru birds in New Zealand originated from.  So much for respecting our treasured legends!  Where are the kaitiaki?

Click on the image for larger size and more details.

Patricia


Spirit of the Volcano

Volcano Spirit - Acrylic - Patricia HowittThought by way of a change, I’d add a painting I’ve just put up in my store on Society6.

This was inspired by New Zealand’s magnificent Central North Island Plateau (National Park as we call it) – the location for 3 volcanoes, 2 of them active.  Note: Mount Tongariro has proved me wrong on this, with a series of recent eruptions – Yay!   The ‘inactive’ volcano – Mount Tongariro – has so many blown-out craters, it’s probably more like a bunch of volcanoes in its own right.

If you saw the “Lord of The Rings” series, one of our active volcanoes on this plateau – Mt Ngauruohoe – was featured as Mt Doom.

Ngauruhoe is actually a beautiful, symmetrical cone, regarded as a female in Maori tradition, and she looks anything but ‘doomful’ under normal conditions.  She does, however, tend to have a plume of steam arising from her crater quite often – a sign that she is by no means as sweet-natured as she may look.

Anyway, the inspiration for this small ACEO painting was Mt Tongariro doing its undoubted best.  Click on the image for larger size and more details …

Volcano Spirit - Acrylic - Patricia Howitt