An Artist's Journeys in Nature

Posts tagged “sherwood foresters

A Daughter of the Regiment

Sherwood Foresters - Patricia HowittOh yes – and a granddaughter of it, too.  Ken’s father, William Ernest Howitt, had also been RSM of the 1st Battalion Scots Guards before him, and he too had artistic talent. 

When my dad ran away from home to join the Guards, he tried to escape the influence of his father’s name on his own career by enlisting in the Coldstreams.  Short-lived dream: the enrolling officers in the Coldstream Guards knew the name Howitt all too well and shunted him off to the Scots Guards real fast.  It was a tradition that sons should follow in their father’s regiment.

Now my grandfather’s mother, Georgiana Howitt (nee Hewitt – Yes!), ran a cab yard at the top of Normanton Road, Derby, England, where I was born.  This involved taxi services, funeral services (all horse-drawn), and a hostelry, or inn. Though she had brothers, it was she who took the business over from her father.  So horses run deep in the family.

The Cab and Handsome

“Handsome” Horse Portrait (on the right)

I used to hear family talk about “the cab yard” from time to time.  It was many years before I got to the bottom of what it was all about.  Not until of my own volition I started riding horses – and wishing I’d learned earlier in life.

To keep her only son out of trouble – and probably to give herself time to run her business – Georgiana packed him off at an early age to live with relatives in Heanor, a small mining and textiles town about 8 miles north-east of Derby.  In that rural environment he labored, did carpentry, found time to paint and sharpened his skills with horses.  As a result I believe he became senior riding instructor at Sandhurst for awhile. He was also an outstanding soldier.

William Erenest Howitt - Scots Guards

My grandfather fought as an NCO with the Scots Guards in the trenches in France in World War l and was severely gassed.  His batman saved his life, and he returned home, to be invalided out of the Guards and into the Sherwood Foresters (now part of the Mercian Regiment of the British Army).

Sherwood Forest – now THERE’S a name that rings through family history down the generations – of which, more to follow later.

My grandfather died when I was still a toddler.  I can remember he used to call me ‘Poppy’, and I remember his roses, his woodworking shed and the aviaries at the bottom of his garden. I dearly wish I had got to know him.  Aside from roses, his love was finches, budgies and canaries. As a sideline, I have bred rare breeds poultry.  That kind of came upon me and I didn’t think of the connection when I first got started …

Sparrow and Aviary

Sparrow – Graphite Pencil (on the left)

When my aunt, Ena May Howitt (my father’s twin), died in Boston USA in 1983, my mother and I went over to clear up her estate.  I hoped above all that I might find some of grandpa’s paintings from the Heanor days.  I’d heard about them – especially one of a water mill at Heanor – and I clung to the dream that they might have been in my aunt’s house in the States.

Well, I came home with heaps of family photos and stuff – but no paintings. The only artwork I have of his are a pair of beautifully painted Scots Guards crests – one for each of his twins, with their names hand-lettered underneath.  They are very dear to me.

W E Howitt & K M Howitt

Among my aunt’s belongings I found my grandfather’s Regular Army Certificate of Service – another of those slim red books.  It came home with me to join my father’s.  

Once again, history repeats itself …   The Final Assessment of Conduct & Character, completed personally in the handwriting of his CO, Major A A Sims, was : “Exemplary”.

Peace,
Patricia