An Artist's Journeys in Nature

The Third Dimension

Sculpture - K M HowittThe instruction I got from my dad went a whole lot further than drawing and painting. Sculpture was his own preferred medium, so naturally he got me involved in that, as a first priority.

He was experimenting with molding and casting processes and it wasn’t long before I was learning the techniques of creating low-relief and three-dimensional sculpture in plasticine and making plaster of paris molds to produce master casts – mostly in plaster of paris also.

My dad had his own very strong sculpture style, which he passed on to me. Usually it was full of cutbacks and tricky shapes, so we started off making waste molds of plaster of paris.  With free-standing sculptures, these molds had to have more than one part.

Mold Making

Plaster of Paris Mold Parts

I learned how to box in the original and use either shims or gravity to make molds in several pieces, keyed into each other. Then to take the cast, we used vaseline as the parting agent before pouring plaster into plaster.  Scary!

The end job of breaking the mold away from the hardened master inside it with a hammer and chisel was always an exciting and tricky business – sometimes fraught with accidents. There was always patching and sanding to do afterwards.

Making molds is a lot easier process today, even though the fundamentals are still the same.  True, you could get rubber molding agents then, but they had to be poured hot – an impossibility with a plasticine original – hence the need to create a durable master cast to work from.

I came away from that early period with several pieces of my own and a wealth of experience.

Spaniel & Tiger Sculptures - Patricia Hoiwitt

Spaniel & Tiger Sculpture Casts – Unfinished

I realize now these early beginnings were a real gift – something else that has never left me.

Ballet Sculpture - Patricia Howitt

Ballet Sculpture Original in Plasticine

A few years ago, I took up sculpture again and found the molding and casting fundamentals I’d learned as a youngster were still there. They stood me in good stead working alone, even though the materials have changed (for the better) over the years.

It’s now most common to use cold-pouring, two-pot molding material, of course, and after a day of instruction at a bronze foundry I was able to adapt my techniques to make ‘rubber’ molds within a supporting plaster jacket very successfully. Thank you, Ken.

More later…

Patricia

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